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WEDI ICD-10 Post-implementation Survey Results Released

Smooth Transition; Industry is Now Focused on Other Initiatives

RESTON, Va. — May 9, 2016 WEDI, the nation’s leading authority on the use of health IT to create efficiencies in healthcare information exchange, announced the release of its findings from its March 2016 ICD-10 post-implementation survey. In the May 2 letter to the Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary, WEDI shared survey results and an analysis of the responses on the ICD-10 transition following the Oct. 1, 2015 implementation.

“WEDI has played a tremendous role in educating the industry and helping to best ease the impacts of the ICD-10 transition for many years,” said Jean Narcisi, chair of WEDI. “We wanted this post-implementation survey to be a closing chapter of assessment on why the transition went so well overall and to also leverage specific lessons learned for future large implementations.”

Some key observations from the survey results include the following:

  • Response rate: This survey had a low response rate in relation to prior surveys, possibly indicating the reassignment of ICD-10 project personnel and likely a lack of interest in further ICD-10-related activities that are not operational in nature.
  • Impact of delays: While the changes to the compliance date added cost for many organizations and caused a lack of momentum, all sectors also indicated that the delays improved the ability to perform testing and resulted in a smoother transition.
  • Cost: Vendor and health plan respondents indicated that the cost of implementation was on target with expectations or was more than anticipated. While the majority of provider responses also indicated that costs were in line with expectations or higher, many providers responded that costs were less than expected.
  • Return on investment (ROI): The majority of respondents indicated that they did not expect to realize any ROI with ICD-10.
  • Productivity: The impact to productivity was primarily neutral for vendors and health plans, but there was a slight decrease in productivity for providers.
  • Information sources: All respondents indicated that CMS and WEDI resources were very helpful along with coding materials from industry organizations.
  • Key lessons: Some common themes reflected in the responses indicate the value of starting early, communicating with trading partners and conducting extensive testing.

More information on WEDI events and ICD-10 work products are also available on the WEDI website at www.wedi.org/workgroups/icd-10.

About WEDI

The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI) is the leading authority on the use of health IT to improve healthcare information exchange in order to enhance the quality of care, improve efficiency, and reduce costs of our nation’s healthcare system. WEDI was formed in 1991 by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) and was designated in the 1996 HIPAA legislation as an advisor to HHS. WEDI’s membership includes a broad coalition of organizations, including: hospitals, providers, health plans, vendors, government agencies, consumers, not-for-profit organizations, and standards development organizations. To learn more, visit www.wedi.org and connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

May 9, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 5 blogs containing over 11,000 articles with John having written over 5500 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 18 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

WEDI Launches Genomic Data Exchange Workgroup

Johansen Taber, Scott and Wood to serve as co-chairs for workgroup focused on the landscape of genomic information exchange

RESTON, Va. — October 20, 2015 The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI), the nation’s leading nonprofit authority on the use of health IT to create efficiencies in healthcare information exchange, announced the development of its newest Workgroup focused on Genomic Data Exchange as well as the appointment of three co-chairs to lead the group as it evaluates and outlines a common industry vision for genomic data in healthcare.

“With all of the latest advances in genomic sequencing, profiling, testing and phenotyping, the healthcare industry is quickly entering a completely new era of personalized medicine. This progress will require more advanced health information technology, capable of rapidly accessing, exchanging and processing information to fully inform diagnostic, treatment and prevention decisions at the point of care,” said Devin Jopp, Ed.D, president and CEO of WEDI. “It is important that WEDI, as the leading authority on health IT and health information exchange, bring this issue to the forefront and investigate not only how to build a national infrastructure to support this genomic data, but how to create seamless workflows to enhance the delivery and coordination of care.”

Katherine Johansen Taber, Ph.D., director of the American Medical Association’s Personalized Medicine Program; Adam Scott, vice president of consumer clinical strategy at Aetna; and Grant Wood, senior IT strategist for Intermountain Healthcare’s Clinical Genetics Institute will serve as co-chairs for the WEDI Genomic Data Exchange Workgroup.

The Genomic Data Exchange Workgroup will further evaluate and create a common industry vision and roadmap on how to incorporate genomic data into the American healthcare system. WEDI invites industry professionals with a related focus and interest in furthering the development of coordinated genomic data exchange to participate in the WEDI Workgroup. For more information on participating in the Genomic Data Exchange Workgroup, please contact Emily Smith at esmith@wedi.org.

Emphasizing the importance of the genomics topic to health information technology, this year, WEDI-Con will feature a half-day Genomics Pre-conference Summit on October 26 with leading industry professionals. This summit is open to all interested healthcare stakeholders across provider, payer, vendor and government entities. Both WEDI members and non-members can register online for the conference and/or summit with group discounts available.

The newly formed Workgroup emerged from an initial investigation into a wide range of genomic information exchange issues – including genomic data formats, exchange, privacy controls, security, storage, management, governance, care coordination and payer-provider collaboration – from the preliminary taskforce in the first quarter of 2015.

The preliminary taskforce developed and just released a report on its initial findings, “Issues and Trends in Electronic Genomic Information Exchange,” which spurred the creation of the Genomic Data Exchange Workgroup and identifies specific recommendations for areas of further focus for the new Workgroup within the three domains of Data Access and Integration, Data Exchange and Data Governance.

About WEDI

The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI) is the leading authority on the use of health IT to improve healthcare information exchange in order to enhance the quality of care, improve efficiency, and reduce costs of our nation’s healthcare system. WEDI was formed in 1991 by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) and was designated in the 1996 HIPAA legislation as an advisor to HHS. WEDI’s membership includes a broad coalition of organizations, including: hospitals, providers, health plans, vendors, government agencies, consumers, not-for-profit organizations, and standards development organizations. To learn more, visit www.wedi.org and connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

October 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 5 blogs containing over 11,000 articles with John having written over 5500 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 18 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

WEDI Extends Use of ICD-10 Issue Reporting Database beyond Implementation Deadline

Searchable database of industry submitted questions answered by leading associations and organizations assists industry beyond transition

RESTON, Va. — October 1, 2015 The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI), the nation’s leading nonprofit authority on the use of health IT to create efficiencies in healthcare information exchange, in partnership with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and other industry associations and partners, announced its searchable ICD-10 Issue Reporting Database – originally launched in early 2014 as part of its ICD-10 Implementation Success Initiative – will continue operation after the transition to ICD-10. Through this database, WEDI, CMS and additional partners help to triage issues and provide valuable information and resources to support healthcare organizations in understanding how the new codes and coding standards will impact diagnosis and inpatient procedures.

Once an issue has been submitted into the ICD-10 Issue Reporting Database, it is reviewed by WEDI staff and submitted on to the appropriate resource. After review, answers are made available online in the searchable database to help other healthcare organizations that may be facing similar issues. If name and contact information is provided, WEDI will also follow up directly.

“This tool has been an important component in our goal of ensuring a successful ICD-10 implementation for healthcare providers, payers, clearinghouses and vendors,” said Devin Jopp, Ed.D, president and CEO of WEDI. “As we’ve neared the implementation deadline, questions are coming in at a feverish pace. Because of this, it is important that all healthcare industry stakeholders have continued access to this valuable resource well beyond the transition deadline of October 1.”

Members of the health IT community may continue to send their implementation challenges to the searchable database of ICD-10 issues, which is open to the public for submission. This service is intended for broad-based, ICD-10 transition-related questions and challenges that are encountered, rather than specific consulting code mapping for individual patient cases. Issues can be submitted anonymously, but WEDI highly encourages submitters to provide full contact information so that WEDI can contact the submitter directly once it has a resolution to the issue.

For more information on this and other WEDI ICD-10 initiatives and resources, visit the ICD-10 Workgroup information page.

About WEDI

The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI) is the leading authority on the use of health IT to improve healthcare information exchange in order to enhance the quality of care, improve efficiency, and reduce costs of our nation’s healthcare system. WEDI was formed in 1991 by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) and was designated in the 1996 HIPAA legislation as an advisor to HHS. WEDI’s membership includes a broad coalition of organizations, including: hospitals, providers, health plans, vendors, government agencies, consumers, not-for-profit organizations, and standards development organizations. To learn more, visit www.wedi.org and connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

October 1, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 5 blogs containing over 11,000 articles with John having written over 5500 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 18 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

WEDI Submits Comments on ONC Interoperability Roadmap

12 action steps identified for ONC, based on industry interoperability survey findings

RESTON, Va. — April 07, 2015 — The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI), the nation’s leading nonprofit authority on the use of health IT to create efficiencies in healthcare information exchange, released the survey results of its March 2015 interoperability survey along with an April 3 letter of recommended action steps to the Office of the National Coordinator of Health IT.

As a response to the call for comments to the interoperability roadmap released by the Office of the National Coordinator of Health IT, WEDI issued an industry survey in March 2015 to gauge current electronic information exchange efforts, pinpoint challenges to interoperable exchange, and measure support for a national patient identifier among healthcare stakeholders. Based on the survey responses from 372 organizations, including health plans, providers, health IT vendors, health information exchange organizations and other participants, WEDI relayed the following key observations from the survey findings:

Universal Patient Identifier (UPI)

  1. Current patient matching methodologies are insufficient and ineffective. Healthcare providers report that only 25 percent of electronic patient records are successfully matched on the first pass without manual intervention.
  2. Stakeholders appear to be generally favorable towards a universal patient identifier. A UPI would be supported by 68 percent of organizations surveyed, including providers (62 percent), health plans (79 percent), and health IT vendors (70 percent).
  3. Health data is encrypted when in‐transit to external organizations – however, organizations continue to lag in encrypting data internally and at‐rest. Healthcare providers report that some electronic health data, i.e. 51‐100 percent, is encrypted when in‐transit externally (49 percent), in‐transit internally (35 percent), and at‐rest (36 percent).

Exchange Capabilities

  1. Direct is the primary method currently used by organizations to electronically exchange health information. Direct is used routinely or occasionally by providers for internal exchange (81 percent) and external exchange (63 percent).
  2. Healthcare providers are unable to easily exchange clinical information electronically with non‐affiliated healthcare organizations. With the exception of sending to pharmacies, less than 25 percent of provider organizations are able to easily send information to most non‐affiliated healthcare organizations.
  3. Health plans are also unable to easily exchange clinical information electronically with other organizations. Less than 33 percent of health plans are able to easily send information to most non‐affiliated healthcare organizations and less than half are able to easily receive clinical information electronically from other organizations.

Barriers and Challenges

  1. Organizations have difficulty with leveraging electronic data – particularly the process of blending structured and unstructured data. Provider and health plans report difficulties with blending structured and unstructured data (56 percent) and integrating different types of data (44 percent).
  2. The majority of organizations find financial barriers to be a challenge to electronic data exchange, from developing capabilities to ongoing maintenance and fees. Provider organizations are challenged by financial barriers such as infrastructure costs (67 percent), connection and set‐up fees (64 percent), ongoing transactional fees for exchanging data (63 percent), training staff (61 percent), and ongoing membership fees for participating in an HIE (59 percent).

Impact

  1. To date, the electronic exchange of health information is slow to yield strong improvements among healthcare stakeholders. Less than half of provider organizations report that electronic information exchange has improved performance measures such as care coordination (48 percent), information flow (42 percent), quality of care (40 percent), and safety (40 percent).
  2. Organizations are optimistic that electronic exchange of health information will contribute to improvements in the next year. Providers expect exchange to improve care coordination (69 percent), quality of care (66 percent), and information flow (66 percent), and worsen cost of care (7 percent) and provider satisfaction (7 percent).

Health IT Market

  1. Vendor systems provide mixed levels of exchange functionality with other health IT products. Vendors report that their systems (self‐built or in partnership with other vendors) currently facilitate external data exchange of data types such as demographics (84 percent), insurance enrollment/eligibility status and benefits (77 percent), hospital ADT (68 percent), and summary of care records (65 percent).
  2. Vendor systems are still nascent in their patient‐centered capabilities. Little functionality is available to facilitate exchange of patient‐centered information such as patient‐reported data (38 percent) and advanced directive (43 percent).
  3. Vendor systems can generally offer strong data exchange capabilities. Systems are equipped to exchange structured clinical data (81 percent) and administrative data (88 percent), as well as unstructured clinical data (74 percent) and administrative data (81 percent).
  4. A minority of vendors have developed revenue models from providers sending and receiving electronic health information, including transactional, monthly, and annual fee structures. Among the EHR vendors surveyed, the most common form of revenue is a monthly fee (33 percent); no EHR vendors reported other fee structures.
  5. More alignment among vendors is needed to advance interoperability. Vendors report a number of barriers to the electronic exchange of health information, including the lack of interoperability with other vendor systems (67 percent), unstable market (62 percent), cost of development (63 percent), and lack of consensus around required data standards (59 percent).

The full reporting of survey results is available on the WEDI website along with the complete letter to ONC. Based on the survey results, industry stakeholders appear to continue to move forward in their efforts to exchange clinical information, but growth is inhibited due to implementation costs and limited visible impact on clinical and business outcomes.

“WEDI applauds the work of ONC to develop a common framework for interoperability in our nation through the release of the recent roadmap,” said Devin Jopp, Ed.D., WEDI president and CEO. “However, what we’ve found — from not only this industry interoperability survey, but also from our discussions around concerns from key groups — is that there are significant barriers to interoperable electronic data exchange that remain to be addressed across providers, health plans and vendors alike. We want to ensure that the roadmap is one that is realistic and viable for all entities involved, so that the industry can rally together around the work, rather than be discouraged or hesitant.”

About WEDI

The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI) is the leading authority on the use of health IT to improve healthcare information exchange in order to enhance the quality of care, improve efficiency, and reduce costs of our nation’s healthcare system. WEDI was formed in 1991 by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) and was designated in the 1996 HIPAA legislation as an advisor to HHS. WEDI’s membership includes a broad coalition of organizations, including: hospitals, providers, health plans, vendors, government agencies, consumers, not-for-profit organizations, and standards development organizations. To learn more, visit www.wedi.org and connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

April 7, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 5 blogs containing over 11,000 articles with John having written over 5500 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 18 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

WEDI Survey Suggests Mixed Industry ICD-10 Readiness

Responses from more than 1,100 vendors, health plans and providers indicate ICD-10 delay has slowed some readiness activities; compliance date uncertainty cited as top obstacle

RESTON, Va. — April 6, 2015 The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI), the nation’s leading nonprofit authority on the use of health IT to create efficiencies in healthcare information exchange, announced the release of its findings from its February 2015 ICD-10 Industry Readiness Survey.  In its March 31 letter to the HHS Secretary, WEDI reported concern with the current level of industry preparedness noting that many organizations did not take full advantage of the additional time afforded by the one-year delay.

“Unless all industry segments take the initiative to make a dedicated effort and move forward with their implementation work, there will be significant disruption on Oct. 1, 2015,” said Devin Jopp, Ed.D, president and CEO of WEDI.

Highlights from the latest survey findings include:

  • Compliance date uncertainty: Uncertainty around further delays was listed as a primary obstacle to implementation, appearing on more than 50 percent of all responses for vendors, health plans and providers.
  • Health plan testing: More than 50 percent of health plans have begun external testing, and of these, a few have completed testing. This is a slight improvement from the prior survey.
  • Vendor product availability: About 60 percent indicated their vendor products were available or they had started customer testing. This is a slight decrease from about two-thirds in the August 2014 survey. However, the number that responded ‘unknown’ decreased from one eighth to just a handful.
  • Provider testing: Only 25 percent of provider respondents had begun external testing and only a few others had completed this step. This is actually a decrease from the about 35 percent of provider respondents that had begun external testing in the August 2014 survey.

“Based on the survey results, it appears the delay has had a negative impact on some readiness activities—especially external testing. Uncertainty over further delays was listed as a top obstacle across all industry segments,” said Jim Daley, WEDI past-chair and ICD-10 Workgroup co-chair. “While the delay provided more time for the transition to ICD-10, many organizations did not take full advantage of this additional time and many providers are falling further behind.”

About the Survey
The survey results are based on responses from 1,174 respondents, consisting of 796 providers, 173 vendors and 205 health plans. The number of responses more than doubled from the last ICD-10 survey WEDI conducted in August 2014.

This is the tenth ICD-10 readiness survey WEDI has conducted since 2009, all of which were done in an effort to gain a broad perspective on the readiness status for different sections of the industry, and to gauge how quickly they are progressing towards the Oct. 1, 2015 implementation deadline. The full survey results are contained in WEDI’s letter to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). More information on WEDI events and ICD-10 work products are also available on the WEDI website atwww.wedi.org/workgroups/icd-10.

About WEDI

The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI) is the leading authority on the use of health IT to improve healthcare information exchange in order to enhance the quality of care, improve efficiency, and reduce costs of our nation’s healthcare system. WEDI was formed in 1991 by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) and was designated in the 1996 HIPAA legislation as an advisor to HHS. WEDI’s membership includes a broad coalition of organizations, including: hospitals, providers, health plans, vendors, government agencies, consumers, not-for-profit organizations, and standards development organizations. To learn more, visit www.wedi.org and connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

April 6, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 5 blogs containing over 11,000 articles with John having written over 5500 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 18 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

WEDI Releases ICD-10 Readiness Survey for Industry Participation

Providers, health plans, vendors and clearinghouses to submit responses before March 6 

RESTON, Va. — February 12, 2015— The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI), the nation’s leading nonprofit authority on the use of health IT to create efficiencies in healthcare information exchange, announced the release of an ICD-10 readiness survey to determine how well the healthcare industry is progressing towards the Oct. 1, 2015 implementation deadline. The survey results will be evaluated and compiled into a report for the industry.

Providers, health plans, vendors and clearinghouses are invited to participate in this important initiative to help monitor progress as we move closer toward the implementation deadline. The survey is available here. The final submission deadline is March 6, 2015.

“WEDI has been conducting these surveys since 2009, allowing us to gain a broad perspective on the readiness status for different sections of the industry, and to gauge how quickly they are progressing,” says Jim Daley, WEDI past-chair and ICD-10 Workgroup co-chair. “Since the shift to ICD-10 represents such a significant change to the industry, it is imperative that all organizations stay diligently focused and continue the necessary preparations in order to make the conversion in Oct. 2015 as smooth as possible. This survey is an important part of the educational and advisory roles our organization plays within the industry on ICD-10 and other health IT matters – bringing together all industry sectors to deliver a successful transition.”

As an advisor to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), WEDI brings to the attention of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issues that it believes warrant review and consideration, and continually reports the results of these periodic ICD-10 readiness surveys to CMS.

WEDI will continue to conduct surveys throughout 2015, and information collected from these surveys will help determine where additional outreach and education is needed.

About WEDI
The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI) is the leading authority on the use of health IT to improve healthcare information exchange in order to enhance the quality of care, improve efficiency, and reduce costs of our nation’s healthcare system. WEDI was formed in 1991 by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) and was designated in the 1996 HIPAA legislation as an advisor to HHS. WEDI’s membership includes a broad coalition of organizations, including: hospitals, providers, health plans, vendors, government agencies, consumers, not-for-profit organizations, and standards development organizations. To learn more, visit www.wedi.org and connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

February 12, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 5 blogs containing over 11,000 articles with John having written over 5500 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 18 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

GE Healthcare and NextGen Healthcare First to Achieve EHNAC’s Practice Management System Accreditation

Organizations evaluated on key performance standards of quality, privacy and security, as well as PMS vendor ICD-10 readiness
FARMINGTON, Conn. – January 20, 2015 The Electronic Healthcare Network Accreditation Commission (EHNAC), a non-profit standards development organization and accrediting body for organizations that electronically exchange healthcare data, announced today that GE Healthcare and NextGen Healthcare are the first two organizations to achieve accreditation under its Practice Management System Accreditation Program (PMSAP).
 
 Jointly developed with the Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI), PMSAP has been designed to serve as a third-party review and provide an additional level of assurance to the provider community during the evaluation process of PMS system vendors.
 

The accreditation program offers a comprehensive evaluation of practice management system (PMS) vendors in the areas of privacy, security, mandated standards and operating rules, and key operational functions. Additionally, the PMSAP assesses health information and oversight for meeting privacy and security, HIPAA and ACA requirements, as well as focuses on technical performance, business processes and resource management. Additionally, the program provides a review of the PMS vendor readiness to support and implement ICD-10 in 2015 and therefore a level of assurance to the provider community.

As beta participants throughout the consultative and consensus-driven process of program development, GE Healthcare and NextGen Healthcare were the first to undergo evaluation on their compliance with the criteria and receive full accreditation status for the two-year timeframe.

“As healthcare and its payment system becomes more complex, it is essential that providers rely on systems and solutions they can trust,” said Jon Zimmerman, vice president and general manager, Clinical Business Solutions at GE Healthcare. “In collaboration with the leadership of EHNAC and WEDI, we have taken another big step forward toward providing standards based solutions that providers can use with confidence to run their businesses. This is another demonstration of our commitment to our customers to provide leading solutions in uncertain times.”

“Building trust in the healthcare community is essential to moving healthcare forward and through our collaborative efforts with EHNAC, we are at the forefront of providing the necessary security and trust assurances to enable more secure, efficient and effective healthcare delivery,” said Michael Lovett, executive vice president and general manager for NextGen Healthcare. “Being the first to achieve EHNAC accreditation underscores our commitment to ensuring that client and patient privacy is a top priority.”

“As beta organizations for the PMS accreditation program, GE Healthcare and NextGen Healthcare’s collaboration and feedback have been vital components in the development of an industry-changing initiative,” said Lee Barrett, executive director of EHNAC. “The need to maintain high standards of privacy, security and confidentiality as a practice management system vendor is critical, to say the least. These organizations understand the value behind provider assurance in the quality and integrity of the companies with whom they entrust their data. We congratulate them both on their accreditation achievements.”

EHNAC accreditation recognizes excellence in health data processing and transactions, and confirms compliance with industry-established standards and HIPAA regulations. Visit www.ehnac.org for more details on PMSAP and the many other EHNAC accreditation programs.

About EHNAC

The Electronic Healthcare Network Accreditation Commission (EHNAC) is a voluntary, self-governing standards development organization (SDO) established to develop standard criteria and accredit organizations that electronically exchange healthcare data. These entities include accountable care organizations, electronic health networks, EPCS vendors, eprescribing solution providers, financial services firms, health information exchanges, health information service providers, management service organizations, medical billers, outsourced service providers, payers, practice management system vendors and third-party administrators.

EHNAC was founded in 1993 and is a tax-exempt 501(c)(6) nonprofit organization. Guided by peer evaluation, the EHNAC accreditation process promotes quality service, innovation, cooperation and open competition in healthcare. To learn more, visitwww.ehnac.org, contact info@ehnac.org, or follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn andYouTube.

January 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 5 blogs containing over 11,000 articles with John having written over 5500 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 18 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

WEDI’s HPID Workgroup Announces Release of Issue Brief: “What is the Difference Between a Health Plan and Payer?”

Brief simplifies definitions and usage of terms according to the HPID Final Rule

RESTON, Va. — July 28, 2014 — The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI), the nation’s leading nonprofit authority on the use of health IT to create efficiencies in healthcare information exchange, announced today its Health Plan Identifier (HPID) Workgroup has developed an issue brief titled, “What is the Difference Between a Health Plan and Payer?” The HPID Workgroup, a part of WEDI’s Strategic National HPID Implementation Process, worked closely with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to identify common misuse of the terms “health plan” and “payer” across the industry.

These terms, often used interchangeably in the regulation, can cause a misconception of an organization’s role. In an effort to help the industry understand the differences in these terms and how to best use them, WEDI partnered with ASC X12 to develop this issue brief, which includes definitions of both terms and clarifies the role each plays in standard transactions according to the HPID Final Rule.

The brief further explains these defined terms as they are affected by the HPID Final Rule compliance date. An organization currently identified as a payer will continue to be identified as such. However, one that is currently identified as a health plan – and continues to be identified as a health plan after November 7, 2016 – must use an HPID.

“The lack of clarity around the definition of a health plan and payer has caused significant challenges among the payer community in the development of their enumeration strategy,” said Devin Jopp, Ed.D, WEDI president and CEO. “It is our hope that these definitions will help provide a common understanding of how to apply these terms across our industry.”

The issue brief is available for review and can be found online here.

About WEDI

The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI) is the leading authority on the use of health IT to improve healthcare information exchange in order to enhance the quality of care, improve efficiency, and reduce costs of our nation’s healthcare system. WEDI was formed in 1991 by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) and was designated in the 1996 HIPAA legislation as an advisor to HHS. WEDI’s membership includes a broad coalition of organizations, including: hospitals, providers, health plans, vendors, government agencies, consumers, not-for-profit organizations, and standards development organizations. To learn more, visit www.wedi.org and connect with us on TwitterFacebook and LinkedIn.

July 28, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 5 blogs containing over 11,000 articles with John having written over 5500 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 18 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In Response to ICD-10 Delay, WEDI Proposes Aggressive Transition Roadmap

Medicare and Medicaid readiness transparency, expedited testing and expanded education identified as high-priority needs

RESTON, Va. — June 05, 2014 — The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI), the nation’s leading nonprofit authority on the use of health IT to create efficiencies in healthcare information exchange, submitted a letter to the Dept. of Health and Human Services (HHS) outlining a high-level ICD-10 transition roadmap. The letter, written in response to the recent one year ICD-10 delay mandated by the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, details the impact of the postponement on healthcare stakeholders and defines recommended action steps to minimize continued disruption to the healthcare industry.

In the letter, several action steps are detailed including:

  • Ensure Medicare and Medicaid readiness transparency
  • Expedite, supporting and expanding industry testing
  • Expand provider education and support
  • Target outreach to non-covered entities
  • Conduct or support limited pilots
  • Establish clear milestones and track readiness

“WEDI and our industry partners believe that these recommendations provide a framework that we can work towards in order to ensure the successful ICD-10 transition,” said Devin Jopp, Ed.D., WEDI president and CEO. “It is critical that HHS work with private industry to establish credibility in a new compliance date by focusing on critical issues such as readiness transparency, comprehensive testing, and augmented education. Absent these actions, we are concerned that implementation of the code sets will continue to be protracted, adding needless administrative burden and cost to the industry.”

In development of the ICD-10 Transition Roadmap, WEDI convened an industry ICD-10 Summit on April 30, 2014 in Reston, Va, that featured participation of more than two hundred industry stakeholders. The Summit was a collaborative event co-sponsored by the Professional Association of Healthcare Office Management (PAHCOM), Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) and the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC).

Read the full letter and learn about the developments from WEDI’s ICD-10 Summit which influenced this communication to HHS.

About WEDI

The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI) is the leading authority on the use of health IT to improve healthcare information exchange in order to enhance the quality of care, improve efficiency, and reduce costs of our nation’s healthcare system. WEDI was formed in 1991 by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) and was designated in the 1996 HIPAA legislation as an advisor to HHS. WEDI’s membership includes a broad coalition of organizations, including: hospitals, providers, health plans, vendors, government agencies, consumers, not-for-profit organizations, and standards development organizations. To learn more, visit www.wedi.org and connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

June 5, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 5 blogs containing over 11,000 articles with John having written over 5500 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 18 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Value-Based Payment Models Expected to Reach Tipping Point by 2018

Availity Research Study Yields Significant Insights into Health Plan Direction and Progress

Implementing Real-Time Information Exchange with Providers is Key to Operational Success

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.–(BUSINESS WIRE)– 82% of health plans responding to a recent survey consider payment reform a ‘major priority.’ Nearly 60% forecast that more than half of their business will be supported by value-based payment models in the next five years. And, of those, 60% are at least mid-way through implementation. That is according to a study published today by Availity, one of the nation’s leading health information networks.

The Health Plan Readiness to Operationalize New Payment Models study delves into the progress of the country’s commercial health plans, as they migrate from fee-for-service to value-based models of compensating physicians. Importantly, the study highlights the consensus among plans that information sharing with physicians must be automated – primarily in real-time – for these models to achieve success.

“With such a strong focus on payment reform in this country, we felt it was important to study how the health plan community was progressing and what connectivity barriers may be delaying or preventing their ability to transition to value-based models,” said Russ Thomas, Availity CEO. “As a health information network, we are keenly aware of our role in enabling the exchange of information needed [by health plans and physicians] to ensure these models work efficiently. This study endeavors to identify the information-oriented problems that need solving so the industry can achieve success as quickly and efficiently as possible.”

Transitioning to payment models that base compensation on outcomes requires physicians and health plans to exchange new kinds of information – different than what is required under today’s predominant fee-for-service arrangements. 90% of health plans agree that automating the exchange of ‘new’ information required under value-based payments is critical to success, with 85% saying the highest value will come from real-time exchange, though less than half have real-time capabilities.

The study further details the lines of business targeted for new payment models, payment model maturity, and expectations for growth over the next 18 months. Please click or visit http://www.availity.com/news-resources/case-studies/ to download a copy of the study.

“The physician revenue cycle is changing and the data collected in this study gives us guidance on how quickly that may happen,” said Thomas. “WEDI (Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange) recently announced plans to publish a report highlighting areas of focus for health IT over the next 20 years, and value-based payment models made the top three. We’re seeing the shift begin; we’re excited about the future and the contributions we are making to ensure the health of our customers’ businesses.”

About Availity

Availity delivers revenue cycle and related business solutions for health care professionals who want to build healthy, thriving organizations. Availity has the powerful tools, actionable insights and expansive network reach that medical businesses need to get an edge in an industry constantly redefined by change. To learn more, visit www.availity.com.

June 1, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 5 blogs containing over 11,000 articles with John having written over 5500 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 18 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.