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Logicalis Healthcare Solutions Warns Healthcare CIOs: Telehealth Has Reached Its Tipping Point

Solution Provider Says Now is the Time to Implement Telehealth Plans

NEW YORK, January 26, 2017 – It’s no secret that telehealth will be among the most talked about healthcare IT topics at HIMSS17 – a prediction perfectly aligned with last month’s revelation from the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) that telemedicine is its members’ top medical regulatory issue. According to Logicalis Healthcare Solutions, the healthcare-focused arm of Logicalis US, an international IT solutions and managed services provider (www.us.logicalis.com), telehealth is at a tipping point as the lines between healthcare and telehealth continue to blur. Soon, there will be no distinction between the two – telehealth will become a natural extension of the way medical care is provided. Logicalis warns that healthcare organizations that are unprepared for this change put themselves at risk of being overwhelmed by the coming onslaught of expectations and regulations as the consumerization of IT extends to the healthcare market.  To help healthcare CIOs transition to a successful telehealth implementation, Logicalis is offering a downloadable white paper, “How to Design and Implement a Successful Telehealth Program for Your Organization.”

“Younger generations of patients are digital natives, so a concept like telehealth is not foreign to them.  When possible, they would rather see their clinicians virtually than face-to-face.  Think of it like the transition from banking in front of a teller to online banking or from shopping in a store to using Amazon – the change that’s coming in healthcare will be just as widespread and radical,” says Ed Simcox, Practice Leader, Logicalis Healthcare Solutions. “To accommodate this, the regulatory environment is changing and the way that payers reimburse for telehealth is improving. Yet, a lot of healthcare organizations are still playing a wait-and-see game.  Our advice is to take strong initial steps now, planning the implementation of their telehealth programs and blending them into their overall clinical profile so they don’t get left behind by patients and payers alike.  Implementing telehealth doesn’t happen overnight – start now or you could miss the boat.”

How Does Telehealth Fit into the ONC’s Triple Aim?

As hospitals and healthcare systems work toward the ideal of value-based care, they are under tremendous pressure from payers to deliver better population health as a whole and from an increasingly younger patient demographic to deliver a more consumer-like healthcare experience.  Understandably, these pressures have led the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) to adopt as one of its top missions the Triple Aim, three important healthcare industry goals originally conceived by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) for optimizing the performance of health systems.  The experts at Logicalis Healthcare Solutions point out that telehealth can contribute significantly to achieving each goal, a key indicator that telehealth’s time has come.

1.      Improve the Patient’s Care Experience: The goal of telehealth is to give patients anytime, anywhere access to quality care.  With telehealth, hospitals and healthcare systems can literally deliver the physician’s office via an app to a patient’s computer or mobile device. By taking the physical exam room or clinic out of the picture and putting the virtual version of that experience directly into the consumer’s hands, healthcare providers are taking the next step in the consumerization of healthcare IT and delivering the kind of digital service that will usher in a new frontier in medical care.

2.      Improve the Health of Populations: By making healthcare more easily accessible to entire populations of people that previously had physical or geographic limitations to receiving it, telehealth can improve the health of entire populations. Imagine, for example, a senior citizen who has trouble walking and can no longer drive – simply getting to the doctor for diagnoses and periodic followup examinations may be difficult which means such patients often forego recommended care.  Imagine, too, the difficulty for families who don’t have ready access to a reliable vehicle – how will they visit the doctor in person? Telehealth gives them an alternate solution.

3.      Reduce Per Capita Costs of Healthcare: When providers make it easier for patients to consume healthcare, patients become more compliant – and, typically, as compliance with medical advice improves, so does the patient’s health. By monitoring chronic conditions, for example, via telehealth, healthcare organizations can bend the cost curve for an entire population of at-risk people, improving each individual’s overall health and reducing the cost of care as a result.

About Logicalis

Logicalis is an international multi-skilled solution provider providing digital enablement services to help customers harness digital technology and innovative services to deliver powerful business outcomes.

Our customers cross industries and geographical regions; our focus is to engage in the dynamics of our customers’ vertical markets including financial services, TMT (telecommunications, media and technology), education, healthcare, retail, government, manufacturing and professional services, and to apply the skills of our 4,000 employees in modernizing key digital pillars, data center and cloud services, security and network infrastructure, workspace communications and collaboration, data and information strategies, and IT operation modernization.

We are the advocates for our customers for some of the world’s leading technology companies including Cisco, HPE, IBM, NetApp, Microsoft, VMware and ServiceNow.

The Logicalis Group has annualized revenues of over $1.5 billion from operations in Europe, North America, Latin America and Asia Pacific. It is a division of Datatec Limited, listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange and the AIM market of the LSE, with revenues of over $6.5 billion.

For more information, visit www.us.logicalis.com.

January 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Logicalis Global Survey: Digital Brings Fresh Challenges for Three-Fourths of CIOs

Solution Provider Says Distributed IT, Shadow IT Departments, and Data Security Risks Are Top of Mind for IT Leaders as Businesses Respond to Threats from Digital Disrupters Worldwide

NEW YORK, October 24, 2016 – A new study by Logicalis, an international IT solutions and managed services provider (www.us.logicalis.com), examined the significant challenges facing CIOs worldwide as they enable businesses in every market segment to respond to threats posed by digital disrupters like Uber and Airbnb.  The 2016 Logicalis Global CIO Survey, now in its fourth year, polled over 700 CIOs worldwide. According to the survey, distributed IT, shadow IT departments and data security are among the biggest issues facing CIOs today. Download a copy of the report, “Digital Enablers: The Challenges Facing CIOs in an Age of Digital Transformation,” here: http://ow.ly/sRjQ305o2f1.

The Logicalis study also revealed that the pace of digital transformation is gathering speed with 73 percent of firms around the world, to some extent, now calling themselves “digitally enabled.” Overall, the survey showed that digital adoption conforms to an innovation bell curve in which:

  • Digitally enabled innovators, or digital disrupters, now account for 7 percent of businesses.
  • Early adopters comprise 22 percent of businesses worldwide.
  • An early majority accounts for 45 percent of firms, while 22 percent fall into the late majority category.
  • And laggards, or those not digitally enabled at all, account for just 5 percent of businesses around the globe.

“This speaks both to the huge benefits that digital transformation brings,” says Mark Rogers, Chief Executive Officer, Logicalis Group, “but also to the scale of the challenge posed by digital disrupters and early transformers – while such a rapid transformation almost certainly means big changes for CIOs and IT departments.”

Big Challenges for CIOs

This rapidly changing environment does indeed pose big challenges for CIOs, the survey found.  CIOs have, for instance, less control over IT spending than ever before – 40 percent of CIOs now say they make 50 percent or fewer of their companies’ IT spending decisions.

This trend is also reflected in the frequency with which CIOs are bypassed altogether – with line of business buying technology without involving IT at all.  The proportion reporting that this happens often, very often or most of the time has risen from 29 percent in 2015 to 39 percent in 2016.

Distributed IT and the Shadow IT Department

One result of this loss of control is a move away from centralized IT, with more and more CIOs now operating in “distributed” IT environments.  Perhaps surprisingly, this decentralization of IT, which is a natural extension of “shadow IT,” is no longer seen as subversive, however, and is instead viewed as a positive and essential element of digital transformation.

For example, though the vast majority of CIOs (83 percent) report that line of business departments now employ IT people whose role is to support business function-specific software, applications and cloud services – essentially acting as shadow IT departments – CIOs seem content to work with them.  In fact, more than one-fifth of the world’s IT leaders (22 percent) report working with these “shadow IT departments” on a daily basis, while 41 percent report doing so at least weekly.

“The challenge for IT departments and CIOs is to find ways to support these specialists effectively,” says Vince DeLuca, Chief Executive Officer, Logicalis US, “securing the infrastructure, applications and vital data without stifling the ‘shadow innovation’ their skills support.”

Security Challenges

Together, the combination of the Internet of Things (IoT), distributed IT, and the increased pervasiveness of applications into the very core of the business – along with an ever-evolving threat landscape – represents a perfect security storm.

As a result, the CIOs surveyed cited security as far and away the biggest challenge related to the increased use of cloud services.  More than three quarters (78 percent) pointed to security as a challenge, with related issues like data sovereignty (47 percent) and local data regulations (37 percent) coming in second and third.

Looking at security threats in more detail, CIOs expect the prevalence of increasingly sophisticated threats (61 percent) to be the No. 1 issue for the next 12 months, while issues like ransomware and corporate extortion were highlighted by more than half (56 percent).

Looking Outside for Help

The sheer range of issues facing CIOs as a result of their organizations’ digital transformation means the pressure to hand off day-to-day technology management, to focus on strategy, and to reframe IT departments as internal service providers is now greater than ever.

In response, CIOs are increasingly seeking partner-led and partner-delivered services.  This year, one-fourth (24 percent) of the CIOs surveyed say they outsource most (more than 50 percent) of their IT, while the number outsourcing none or just 10 percent of their IT has dropped dramatically – falling respectively to 9 percent (compared to 13 percent in 2015) and 19 percent (compared to 26 percent in 2015).

“As digital innovation accelerates, the winners will create new customer experiences, make faster and better decisions through smarter collaboration, and create new digital business models and revenue streams securely,” Rogers says. “CIOs and IT leaders can play a leading role in enabling that innovation, drawing on skills from insightful partners to help shape their businesses and lead their sectors through the application of digital technologies.  I am delighted that Logicalis is already helping clients to plan their digital journeys, releasing the creativity that runs through their workforces and using digital technology to deliver outstanding results.”

About Logicalis

Logicalis is an international multi-skilled solution provider providing digital enablement services to help customers harness digital technology and innovative services to deliver powerful business outcomes.

Our customers cross industries and geographical regions; our focus is to engage in the dynamics of our customers’ vertical markets including financial services, TMT (telecommunications, media and technology), education, healthcare, retail, government, manufacturing and professional services, and to apply the skills of our 4,000 employees in modernizing key digital pillars, data center and cloud services, security and network infrastructure, workspace communications and collaboration, data and information strategies, and IT operation modernization.

We are the advocates for our customers for some of the world’s leading technology companies including Cisco, HPE, IBM, NetApp, Microsoft, VMware and ServiceNow.

The Logicalis Group has annualized revenues of over $1.5 billion from operations in Europe, North America, Latin America and Asia Pacific. It is a division of Datatec Limited, listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange and the AIM market of the LSE, with revenues of over $6.5 billion.

For more information, visit www.us.logicalis.com.

October 24, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Logicalis US to CIOs: Don’t be Held Hostage by Ransomware

Solution Provider IDs Five Proactive Steps CIOs Can Take Now

NEW YORK, September 12, 2016 – Ransomware, which holds business data hostage until a fee is paid, has taken a sharp upturn this year. In fact, a recent industry study found that nearly half of all U.S. businesses have experienced at least one ransomware attack in the past year alone. While organizations wrestle with the ever-pressing issue of whether to pay or not to pay if they’re victimized, Logicalis US, an international IT solutions and managed services provider (www.us.logicalis.com), suggests CXOs focus first on how to protect, thwart and recover from a potential attack before developing a pay or don’t-pay policy.

“Ransomware has become one of the most sophisticated criminal enterprises the world has ever seen,” says Ron Temske, Vice President, Security Solutions, Logicalis US. “As anyone in the business of cybersecurity knows, we’ve long battled those who simply wanted to create chaos and disruption. We’ve seen nation states attack both military and civilian targets and ‘hacktivists’ who act for various social causes.  But ransomware is different in one key way: It’s all about the money.  Ransomware is a business, complete with sophisticated cybercrime-as-a-service offerings and world-class customer support to ensure its victims’ files are returned expeditiously once the ransom is paid. It’s a service business approaching $1 billion in annual revenue, something that would be heralded as an accomplishment if it weren’t based on such nefarious principles. The business of ransomware has even spawned a network of affiliates that provide redirection of an exploit kit for a cut of the profits.”

Five Ways to Respond to the Threat from Ransomware

To be ready for an attack before it happens, to detect and stop it while it’s happening, or to recover from it after it happens takes planning. To help, Logicalis’ security experts have compiled a list of the top five ways to respond to the threat ransomware poses today.

  1. Create a Modern Defense: Traditional signature-based anti-virus solutions are good to have, but they aren’t up to the job of thwarting a sophisticated ransomware attack.  Neither is your traditional stateful firewall. As a result, it is critically important to plan for the possibility of an attack by developing comprehensive visibility and access to extensive details on how the malware entered the organization’s environment in the first place. IT pros who are serious about heading ransomware off at the pass should focus intently on modern next-generation anti-malware and firewall solutions that can stop an attack before it starts.
  2. Take an Architectural Approach: In some limited situations, point solutions can be effective, but not with ransomware. The most effective way to address the threat posed by ransomware and other pervasive cyberattacks is to take a holistic architectural approach to security that encompasses the entire network including its systems and endpoints as well as the organization’s cloud and mobile strategies. Because so many of today’s threats are automated, solutions that rely on human intervention to detect and respond are neither affordable nor effective, making automation and orchestration key principals in a solid security architecture design.
  3. Prevent the Spread of Malware: If an attacker’s malware does enter the network, it has the ability to spread like a fast-moving cold among passengers on an airplane.  The key at this stage is to compartmentalize data using network micro-segmentation strategies that make it more difficult for malware to spread laterally within the environment.
  4. Plan Your Recovery: The unfortunate truth is, despite the security industry’s best efforts, no organization is entirely immune to attack.  Therefore, it’s critical to examine how the organization will recover if it is breached. First, be sure you’re backing up. Second, test, test and re-test the backup and restore process; a backup is only valuable if the data can actually be restored when it’s needed.  It’s also important to ensure that the restore can be done at the system level since file-based recovery may not be enough. Consider, too, how much redundancy is required; if the organization is hit, do you have an uncorrupted source from which you can immediately recover? And be sure to weigh the costs of various solutions against the cost of potential loss or downtime – not all data is equally valuable, which means not all data needs the same level of protection.
  5. Create a Pay or No-Pay Policy: Finally, the big question: To pay or not to pay? No vertical market is having a tougher time facing this question than healthcare is today; whether it’s critical patient-care data that hackers hold hostage or the threat of hefty regulatory fines imposed when protected patient health information (PHI) is breached, healthcare organizations have become prime targets for ransomware attacks. Before any organization – healthcare or otherwise – pays a ransom, however, Temske suggests examining how much damage will be done if you don’t pay. Do you have an uncompromised data backup from which you can restore? What is the cost to restore vs. pay – both monetarily and in terms of the business’ ability to function in the meantime? Ultimately, the decision comes down to how business-critical the compromised data is to the organization. If you do decide to pay, Temske has one word of advice: “Negotiate. In most cases, you can talk the price down, so it may make sense to consider not paying the first amount offered.”

About Logicalis
Logicalis is an international multi-skilled solution provider providing digital enablement services to help customers harness digital technology and innovative services to deliver powerful business outcomes.

Our customers cross industries and geographical regions; our focus is to engage in the dynamics of our customers’ vertical markets including financial services, TMT (telecommunications, media and technology), education, healthcare, retail, government, manufacturing and professional services, and to apply the skills of our 4,000 employees in modernizing key digital pillars, data center and cloud services, security and network infrastructure, workspace communications and collaboration, data and information strategies, and IT operation modernization.

We are the advocates for our customers for some of the world’s leading technology companies including Cisco, HPE, IBM, NetApp, Microsoft, VMware and ServiceNow.

The Logicalis Group has annualized revenues of over $1.5 billion from operations in Europe, North America, Latin America and Asia Pacific. It is a division of Datatec Limited, listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange and the AIM market of the LSE, with revenues of over $6.5 billion.

For more information, visit www.us.logicalis.com.

September 12, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Logicalis Healthcare Solutions to CIOs: The Success of Your Telehealth Solution Involves Much More than Technology

Solution Provider Offers Six Ways to Enhance the Patient’s User Experience (UX)

NEW YORK, June 7, 2016 – The adoption of telehealth solutions is clearly on the rise among healthcare providers, an increase significantly bolstered as large employers embrace the technology. Studies show at least 74 percent of the nation’s largest employers plan to offer telehealth benefits this year, and experts estimate virtual consults will increase a stunning 62 percent by 2020. While the numbers are encouraging, however, they may not provide an accurate indicator of telehealth’s future success.  According to Logicalis Healthcare Solutions, the healthcare-focused arm of Logicalis US, an international IT solutions and managed services provider (www.us.logicalis.com), one of the most important factors in the success or failure of any telehealth solution comes down to just one critical question: Are the provider’s patients comfortable using it? It’s just as much about the user experience (UX) as it is the technology used to build it.

“With all the attention being paid to the technological aspect of telehealth, it’s also critical for healthcare organizations to pay close attention to the way they replicate the face-to-face experience in the virtual world,” says Kim Garriott, Principal Consultant, Healthcare Strategies, for Logicalis Healthcare Solutions. “If the entire telehealth experience doesn’t feel comfortable to the patient, the best technology in the world won’t make it a success. The key is to minimize the differences between practicing telemedicine and simply practicing medicine – for telehealth to succeed, the two must become one.”

Six Ways to Enhance the Patient’s Telehealth Experience

When patients have a positive experience with telemedicine, they are more likely to use the service again.  Creating the right environment, therefore, is as important as choosing the right technology, something a solution provider experienced in the healthcare market can help the provider accomplish. Logicalis’ telehealth experts have identified six important factors CIOs need to consider and collaborate with their practitioners about before launching a telehealth initiative.

  1. Focus on First Impressions: When people enter a doctor’s office or hospital, their first experience with that provider is usually in the waiting room.  Often, there are televisions running loops of educational healthcare videos. There are handouts on tables and a receptionist to speak with.  Why should the virtual world be any different? When planning a telehealth solution, it’s important to think through the UX that each patient will have from the time they make an appointment until their visit is complete, and that includes the few minutes that may transpire between the time they sign on until the time the doctor sees them.  Is the screen blank and the patient left to multitask, wondering if they’ve been disconnected? Or is there a lively virtual waiting room with information available while they wait? This first impression sets the stage for the entire visit and may determine whether or not the patient embraces or rejects telemedicine as a whole.
  2. Stage the Location: Before implementing a telehealth solution, think carefully about the physical location where the consults will take place. Consider placing the physician’s endpoint in the doctor’s office, with an orderly bookshelf filled with medical journals behind the physician, or perhaps in an examination room with the exam table located directly behind the doctor’s seat and his or her framed credentials placed purposefully within sight.  If patient consults take place in a pharmacy or other clinical setting, the same holds true; the patient’s endpoint should be in a comfortable, nicely appointed setting. In telehealth’s earliest days, many televisits took place with patients sitting in a stark, white, uninviting, sterile cubby with nothing more than a workstation and a chair. This kind of environment is not conducive to an open and personal discussion. The idea is to give the patient confidence in both the process and the doctor, and to make the televisit look and feel as similar to a face-to-face examination as possible.
  3. Choose a Quiet Spot: Whether the telehealth endpoint is located in a practitioner’s office or a local pharmacy, never place it out in the open where people are walking by or where the typical ebb and flow in the office or retail environment will distract either the patient or doctor while they talk. The environment should be completely quiet – eliminate all background noise so both parties can focus 100 percent of their attention on their interaction.
  4. Guard the Patient’s Privacy: Privacy is as important online as it is in the examination room.  Whether a visit takes place in person or online, patients may need to disrobe to show a condition or injury to the doctor; they won’t feel comfortable if their virtual exam room does not seem private. Online patients expect – and deserve – the same courtesies as those being treated in person, an important consideration when deciding where to locate a telehealth solution inside the practice, pharmacy or physician’s home.
  5. Dress for Success: The way the doctor looks may influence how the patient feels about the overall experience, particularly so with those new to telemedicine. Therefore, practitioners should “dress for success,” wearing what they normally wear to work – whether that’s a suit and tie or a lab coat – in front of the camera.
  6. Always Make Eye Contact: Look the patient in the eye, not the computer. When patients and doctors interact in person, body language plays an important role; doctors may look at a chart while speaking to the patient, but the way they move and hold their bodies still says, “I’m paying attention.” Those nuances are lost in the virtual world, so it’s critical to make eye contact with the patient, and that means looking into the camera, not staring at the patient’s image on the screen.  It may feel unnatural at first, but it will give the patient a sense of connectedness with the doctor even though they may be many miles apart.

Want to Learn More?

About Logicalis

Logicalis is an international IT solutions and managed services provider with a breadth of knowledge and expertise in communications and collaboration; data center and cloud services; and managed services.

Logicalis employs over 4,000 people worldwide, including highly trained service specialists who design, deploy and manage complex IT infrastructures to meet the needs of over 6,500 corporate and public sector customers. To achieve this, Logicalis maintains strong partnerships with technology leaders such as Cisco, HP, IBM, EMC, NetApp, Microsoft, VMware and ServiceNow on an international basis. It has specialized solutions for enterprise and medium-sized companies in vertical markets covering financial services, TMT (telecommunications, media and technology), education, healthcare, retail, government, manufacturing and professional services, helping customers benefit from cutting-edge technologies in a cost-effective way.

The Logicalis Group has annualized revenues of over $1.5 billion from operations in Europe, North America, Latin America and Asia Pacific and is one of the leading IT and communications solution integrators specializing in the areas of advanced technologies and services.

The Logicalis Group is a division of Datatec Limited, listed on the Johannesburg and London AIM Stock Exchanges, with revenues of over $6 billion.

For more information, visit www.us.logicalis.com.

June 7, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Logicalis US Asks 10 Tough Security Questions Every CIO Must Be Able to Answer

NEW YORK, April 19, 2016 – The most important thing CIOs in any industry need to know about IT security, according to Logicalis US, an international IT solutions and managed services provider (www.us.logicalis.com), is that, despite the hype, the fear and the complexity of available solutions, securing digital assets is fundamentally about managing risk.

“It’s important for IT professionals to take their IT security risks seriously,” says Ron Temske, Vice President, Security Solutions, Logicalis US.  “The first thing that has to be established is what you are trying to protect, and whether or not all of your digital assets need the same level of protection.  Most organizations don’t think that way; they see security as a single, across-the-board, ubiquitous solution.  People often think if they have a firewall and anti-virus in place, they’re secure. Others believe no one is targeting them. In both cases, nothing could be farther from the truth. If all you have is traditional antivirus and a firewall, you might as well give your information away – and you might be doing just that. Once a threat moves beyond the firewall, you lose visibility and control of that threat, and that can happen as innocently as having an employee who unwittingly plugs a USB infected with malicious code into their desktop or laptop.  The biggest unpatched security vulnerability you have is your people.  And even if your organization isn’t high profile, your unsecured IT can become a back door for cybercriminals trying to break into your partners’ or clients’ systems. The solution is to develop and implement a comprehensive security program that spans the entire attack continuum – before, during and after an attack.”

This is why, Logicalis experts say, it is critical to know what you are trying to protect against.  A common acronym used among security professionals is CIA, which stands for Confidentiality, Integrity and Availability.

  • Confidentiality is primarily associated with protecting the assets that would cause the client harm if they were disclosed – think patient records in a hospital setting or credit card numbers on a major retail site.
  • Integrity is about ensuring data remains accurate and unaltered – patient prescription information is a good example.
  • Availability is about ensuring that business-critical assets are accessible when needed – consider the importance of medical personnel knowing a patient’s allergies.

To develop a plan that meets CIA objectives, Logicalis suggests organizations embrace two important truths: First, because cybercrime has proven to be a highly profitable venture, everyone has valuable information that criminals want.  And second, eventually, every business will experience some sort of breach.

Before designing and implementing security solutions to mitigate those risks, Logicalis suggests organizations partner with a solution provider experienced in security measures that can perform a vulnerability assessment to identify areas where the organization’s attack surface can be reduced.  Also helpful, the company says, is examining services like Logicalis’ Managed Security offering which can help IT pros focus on their business rather than being distracted by varying degrees of cyber threats and related security posture changes.

“Businesses often put off creating comprehensive security solutions because they fear the price tag, but there’s no need for that,” says Jason Malacko, IT security expert, Logicalis US.  “It’s true that there is no silver bullet.  Security is a process, not a product. People who want to find the ‘one thing’ that will protect their entire organization won’t find that because it doesn’t exist.  That’s because, with mobility and IoT, there is no single perimeter to protect anymore.  Security is more complex than that, and it’s our job as security experts to take that complexity out of the equation while helping our clients protect their digital assets as fully as possible.  But that doesn’t mean people have to deplete their budgets; the key is to match the solution to the client’s actual – rather than perceived – business needs. No one should buy a $1,000 safe to protect a $100 bill.”

10 Security Questions Every CIO Must Be Able to Answer

Cybercrime is an insidious business; it happens in plain sight, avoids detection and causes damage quickly.  There are even cybercrime-as-a-service offerings available to criminals who lack the technical know-how to reap the big jackpots capable of totaling tens of millions of dollars.  So, how do you prepare your organization to overcome an eventual attack? According to Logicalis, the solution begins by answering 10 important questions:

  1. If you knew that your company was going to be breached tomorrow, what would you do differently today?
  2. Has your company ever been breached? How do you know?
  3. What assets am I protecting, what am I protecting them from (i.e., theft, destruction, compromise), and who am I protecting them from (i.e. cybercriminals or even insiders)?
  4. What damage will we sustain if we are breached (i.e., financial loss, reputation, regulatory fines, loss of competitive advantage)?
  5. Have you moved beyond an “inside vs. outside” perimeter-based approach to information security?
  6. Does your IT security implementation match your business-centric security policies? Does it rely on written policies, technical controls or both?
  7. What is your security strategy for IoT (also known as “the Internet of threat”)?
  8. What is your security strategy for “anywhere, anytime, any device” mobility?
  9. Do you have an incident response plan in place?
  10. What is your remediation process? Can you recover lost data and prevent a similar attack from happening again?

Want to Learn More?

About Logicalis

Logicalis is an international IT solutions and managed services provider with a breadth of knowledge and expertise in communications and collaboration; data center and cloud services; and managed services.

Logicalis employs over 4,000 people worldwide, including highly trained service specialists who design, deploy and manage complex IT infrastructures to meet the needs of over 6,500 corporate and public sector customers. To achieve this, Logicalis maintains strong partnerships with technology leaders such as Cisco, HP, IBM, EMC, NetApp, Microsoft, VMware and ServiceNow on an international basis. It has specialized solutions for enterprise and medium-sized companies in vertical markets covering financial services, TMT (telecommunications, media and technology), education, healthcare, retail, government, manufacturing and professional services, helping customers benefit from cutting-edge technologies in a cost-effective way.

The Logicalis Group has annualized revenues of over $1.5 billion from operations in Europe, North America, Latin America and Asia Pacific and is one of the leading IT and communications solution integrators specializing in the areas of advanced technologies and services.

The Logicalis Group is a division of Datatec Limited, listed on the Johannesburg and London AIM Stock Exchanges, with revenues of over $6 billion.

For more information, visit www.us.logicalis.com.

April 19, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Logicalis US Explores the Impact of a Pending U.S. Interest Rate Hike on IT

Solution Provider Suggests CIOs, CTOs Ask Their CFOs Five Important Questions Now

NEW YORK, December 8, 2015 – It has been almost six years since the Federal Reserve raised interest rates, but if market indicators are correct, the central bank may vote to do just that when it meets later this month. What do interest rate hikes have to do with technology adoption? According to Logicalis US, an international IT solutions and managed services provider (www.us.logicalis.com), quite a lot.

“Because it hasn’t happened for so long, a rise in the interest rate will have a cascading effect on business that organizations may find difficult to anticipate,” says Rich Pirrotta, CFO, Logicalis US. “CIOs who have already prepared their budgets for 2016 may want to revisit their plans and talk with their CFOs about sales projections, access to capital and anticipated cap-ex spends to ensure they’re ready. They should also investigate the smartest ways to finance their IT purchases if the interest rate increase does indeed occur.”

Five Important Questions CIOs Should Ask Their CFOs Now
Logicalis US says CIOs and CFOs should have proactive discussions today about capital purchases planned for 2016 in anticipation of a possible interest rate hike during the first quarter of the new year.  To help, Logicalis US finance experts Rich Pirrotta and Todd Yaekle, Vice President of Finance, suggest the following five questions as conversation starters:

1. Can we access the capital we need for 2016 IT projects? The risk profile for organizations looking for capital today is already fairly high, and if rates go up, it could go even higher further restricting access to capital.
2. Should we be thinking about leasing? In the past, CIOs and CFOs considered leasing only when they were able to negotiate favorable terms.  With an interest rate hike pending, however, the decision about turning to leasing will be less about terms and more about the weighted cost of capital. Leasing costs, as a rule of thumb, don’t increase proportionately with capital interest rates. Imagine, for example, the fed agrees on a 25-basis-point increase; interest on debt will rise by that same 25 basis points, while the cost of leasing may only increase 10 to 15 basis points. As a result, as interest rates rise, constrained access to capital will make leasing a much more inviting option.
3. How can we better negotiate with suppliers to mitigate the impact? Instead of negotiating with technology suppliers on the price of their IT purchases, consider negotiating on terms instead.  If you have net 30 terms now, how would a change to net 45 impact your business? CIOs and CFOs should be talking now about the vendor terms and conditions that could help offset the costs incurred due to an interest rate increase.
4. What will a stronger U.S. dollar mean to international sales? An increase in interest rates yields benefits in terms of strengthening the U.S. dollar, but for organizations doing business abroad, it also creates questions about the validity of existing sales forecasts.  If forecasts change, what impact will there be on the business and its ability to fund proposed capital expenses?
5. As the CIO or CTO, what can I do that will help? This may be the perfect time for organizations that have been considering a move to the cloud to consider taking the next step.  Are there cost savings that could be gleaned from a move to a hybrid cloud strategy? Would tapping as-a-service IT offerings save costs internally?  What savings might be possible by partnering with an experienced managed services provider?  These are just a few of the questions top technology pros should be asking themselves now as they look for ways to drive value and innovation in the coming year.  If considerations like these have been on the back burner, it might be time to accelerate those plans.
Want to Learn More?
  • The real value of a business’ IT infrastructure comes from its use, not its ownership.With an interest rate hike pending, leasing can provide a valuable resource for organizations considering a major technology purchase in the coming year.Learn more here:http://ow.ly/VzKGj.
  • Is now the time to consider outsourcing internal “lights-on” tasks like 24x7x365 monitoring and management of your IT systems to an experienced partner? Read about the six surprise benefits of managed services, watch a video about managed services, find out how managed services works, then explore the business benefits of managed services here: http://ow.ly/V1WCa.
  • Wondering if a move to the cloud could save your business money? Take part in a Cloud Readiness Workshop to find out: http://ow.ly/V1Ytl.

About Logicalis
Logicalis is an international IT solutions and managed services provider with a breadth of knowledge and expertise in communications and collaboration; data center and cloud services; and managed services.

Logicalis employs over 4,000 people worldwide, including highly trained service specialists who design, deploy and manage complex IT infrastructures to meet the needs of over 6,500 corporate and public sector customers. To achieve this, Logicalis maintains strong partnerships with technology leaders such as Cisco, HP, IBM, EMC, NetApp, Microsoft, VMware and ServiceNow on an international basis. It has specialized solutions for enterprise and medium-sized companies in vertical markets covering financial services, TMT (telecommunications, media and technology), education, healthcare, retail, government, manufacturing and professional services, helping customers benefit from cutting-edge technologies in a cost-effective way.

The Logicalis Group has annualized revenues of over $1.5 billion from operations in Europe, North America, Latin America and Asia Pacific and is one of the leading IT and communications solution integrators specializing in the areas of advanced technologies and services.

The Logicalis Group is a division of Datatec Limited, listed on the Johannesburg and London AIM Stock Exchanges, with revenues of over $6 billion.

For more information, visit www.us.logicalis.com.

December 8, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Logicalis US IDs Eight Little Known Printing Facts Costing Hospitals Millions of Dollars

Solution Provider Unveils Managed Print Services for Healthcare

NEW YORK, June 9, 2015 – When you think about the technologies that hospitals spend millions of dollars on annually, printers probably don’t top the list – but they should.  Experts say hospitals are seeing as much as an 11 percent increase in their annual print volumes driven by Meaningful Use, the Affordable Care Act, ICD-10, and the adoption of electronic record-keeping (EMR/EHR) methodologies.  At the same time, healthcare IT experts have begun to realize they have little visibility into their organizations’ print assets or operations, something which often leads to stockpiling of supplies and, all too often, to a mismatch of equipment and needs.  Recognizing this, Logicalis US, an international IT solutions and managed services provider (www.us.logicalis.com), today announced availability of its Managed Print Services (MPS) for Healthcare, a cloud-based offering specifically designed to generate cost savings by monitoring print activity and providing analytics and automated alerts to optimize supply orders and service requests.

“Sometimes we let the cool new technologies in our industry get in the way of caring for simple, yet really important things that can reduce costs and improve quality,” says Ed Simcox, Practice Leader, Logicalis Healthcare Solutions. “We all use and walk past printers every day in a hospital setting, but how often do we stop and ask if we’re using these assets to the best of our ability? Are things being printed unnecessarily leading us to overpay for and underutilize these assets? How much money do we spend managing these printers, and how many calls does the help desk get? While it may sound mundane, these are important questions to ask.  Everyone is doing more with less money, and hospitals are looking for places to save costs without affecting patient care; with a service-focused partner providing proper oversight, you can literally save millions of dollars enterprise-wide by instituting best practices in a managed print solution.”

Case in Point
One of the world’s leading cancer research institutes was considering updating an aging fleet of more than 2,500 printers with a significant number of locally attached USB devices.  After trying for 60 days to manually sift through and compile data from paper reports related to print volumes and other pertinent statistics, a consultant who had originally been assigned the task of developing three- and five-year total cost of ownership (TCO) projections estimated he would need at least six months to complete the data collection in order to assess potential savings areas. Managed Print Service technology, however, was able to automate the data collection and report results in significantly less time, quickly identifying three-year TCO reductions in excess of $500,000.

Eight Little Known Facts about Healthcare Printing

  1. Output Growth: Experts say annual print volumes are increasing by as much as 9 percent in black and white and 19 percent in color print processes, 11 percent overall.
  2. Per-User Costs: Analysts estimate that the average healthcare employee generates between $850 and $1,000 per year in document output costs.
  3. Help Desk Woes: As many as half of all calls to a hospital’s help desk are related to print issues.
  4. Waste Reduction: Up to 25 percent of consumables and parts are wasted, something which can often be significantly reduced with predictive ordering.
  5. Ink the Deal: Early cartridge replacement prompts are responsible for as much as 15% of ink supplies waste.
  6. Be Aware: Desktop-connected printers can be the most expensive component of the printer fleet on a per-page basis, tend to be underutilized, have more expensive supplies, and are complex to track and manage.
  7. Significant Savings: A first-year average return on investment for a Managed Print Service solution is as high as 35 percent of the hospital’s print-related expenses.
  8. HIPAA-Safe: Managed Print Service providers never see the actual documents, just the volume data, which means there is no possibility for a HIPAA violation to occur.

About Logicalis

Logicalis is an international IT solutions and managed services provider with a breadth of knowledge and expertise in communications and collaboration, data center and cloud services, and managed services.

Logicalis employs over 4,000 people worldwide, including highly trained service specialists who design, specify, deploy and manage complex IT infrastructures to meet the needs of almost 6,000 corporate and public sector customers.  To achieve this, Logicalis maintains strong partnerships with technology leaders such as Cisco, HP, IBM, EMC, NetApp, Microsoft, VMware and ServiceNow on an international basis and has specialized solutions for enterprise and medium-sized companies in vertical markets covering financial services, telecommunications, media and technology, education, healthcare, retail, government, manufacturing and professional services helping customers benefit from cutting-edge technologies in a cost-effective way.

The Logicalis Group has annualized revenues of over $1.5 billion from operations in Europe, North America, Latin America and Asia Pacific and is one of the leading IT and communications solution integrators specializing in the areas of advanced technologies and services.

The Logicalis Group is a division of Datatec Limited, listed on the Johannesburg and London AIM Stock Exchanges, with revenues of approximately $6 billion.

For more information, visit www.us.logicalis.com.

June 9, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Logicalis US: Image Management is One of Healthcare CIOs’ Toughest Tasks

Solution Provider IDs Five Core Components in an Effective Enterprise Imaging Strategy

NEW YORK, March 24, 2015 – Gathering, storing, accessing, and analyzing a rapidly expanding volume of patient images is one of the most complex IT tasks in today’s healthcare environments. These images tell a patient’s clinical life story, and with the recent proliferation of affordable digital technologies such as point-of-care ultrasounds, digital cameras and medical/surgical scopes, images in varying formats are being produced in record numbers by a variety of service lines outside of radiology – including surgical services, dermatology and pathology.  According to Logicalis US, an international IT solutions and managed services provider (www.us.logicalis.com), the key to managing these images is to develop a comprehensive enterprise imaging strategy that addresses five core components and to do so, in a standardized, vendor neutral way.

“Developing a thorough enterprise imaging strategy is quickly becoming one of the most important things a hospital CIO can do,” says Kim Garriott, Principal Consultant, Healthcare Strategies, Logicalis Healthcare Solutions.  “Medical imaging is so much more than just capturing and storing X-rays and ultrasounds; it’s a multi-modal discipline that gathers images from a variety of sources and makes them readily available to clinicians through the patient’s electronic medical record (EMR) regardless of the underlying technology used to obtain them. Imaging gives clinicians information they need to enhance patient outcomes, and having that technology available, from a business perspective, can result in increased reimbursements from insurance and Medicare.  Beyond the obvious quality of care issues, hospitals that aren’t taking the steps necessary to move their imaging management practices to the next level risk regulatory infringements and compromised data security making the development of an enterprise imaging strategy one of the most important tasks in healthcare IT.”

Healthcare Imaging’s Five Core Components
Logicalis Healthcare Solutions’ imaging experts have identified five core components that, when properly addressed within the healthcare system’s enterprise imaging strategy, will result in improved coordination of care, increased satisfaction among clinicians, improved patient engagement, streamlined operational costs, and stronger regulatory compliance:

  1. Acquisition: Healthcare IT pros must discover the technologies and clinical workflows used to acquire medical images across as many as 40 service lines before developing their EMR optimization plans.
  2. Storage: Keeping medical images on hand involves more than just storing them; it also requires an in-depth disaster recovery plan and whole-system monitoring to ensure those images are both available and secure 24×7.
  3. Access: Until now, physicians have accessed medical images in a variety of cumbersome ways ranging from portals to unsecure CDs and other portable media delivered directly by the patient into the doctor’s hands.  What doctors want – and are beginning to expect – is to have the patient’s entire medical image library available through their EMR and accessible for viewing regardless of device or source of acquisition.
  4. Sharing: The ultimate goal is for a variety of clinicians to be able to collaborate, securely sharing a patient’s images both within the same healthcare provider and between providers regardless of where those images reside.
  5. Analytics: Clinicians also need to be able to analyze medical images and the associated meta-data in a thoughtful, patient-centric way that leads them to new diagnoses and treatment plans that can benefit both the individual patient as well as a larger patient population as a whole.

Want to Learn More?

About Logicalis
Logicalis is an international IT solutions and managed services provider with a breadth of knowledge and expertise in communications and collaboration, data center and cloud services, and managed services.

Logicalis employs over 3,800 people worldwide, including highly trained service specialists who design, specify, deploy and manage complex IT infrastructures to meet the needs of almost 6,000 corporate and public sector customers.  To achieve this, Logicalis maintains strong partnerships with technology leaders such as Cisco, HP, IBM, CA Technologies, EMC, NetApp, Microsoft, VMware and ServiceNow.

The Logicalis Group has annualized revenues of $1.6 billion from operations in Europe, North America, Latin America and Asia Pacific and is one of the leading IT and communications solution integrators specializing in the areas of advanced technologies and services.

The Logicalis Group is a division of Datatec Limited, listed on the Johannesburg and London AIM Stock Exchanges, with revenues of approximately $6 billion.

March 24, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Logicalis US Reveals Eight Mistakes Hospitals Make with Electronic Patient Records

Solution Provider Helps Healthcare CIOs Contribute More Strategic Value to Their Organizations

NEW YORK, November 11, 2014 – A few short years ago, electronic medical record (EMR) systems were employed by only a handful of the most sophisticated physicians and hospitals.  Now, as a result of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act’s “Meaningful Use” incentives, part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), providers are scrambling to purchase and implement EMR systems.  But that doesn’t mean they’re using them.  Doctors are disillusioned by spending more time with the computer than their patients, and they aren’t taking full advantage of the vast capabilities EMR software suites make available to them.  According to Logicalis US, an international IT solutions and managed services provider (www.us.logicalis.com), there are eight critical areas where healthcare professionals can sharpen their IT skills and optimize their utilization of data residing in feature-rich electronic medical records.

“The primary issues with EMR today are the continued lack of utilization and mismatched expectations by clinicians and administrators about the native problem-solving capabilities of EMR,” says Ed Simcox, Healthcare Practice Leader for Logicalis Healthcare Solutions.  “Many hospitals use only a portion of the capabilities available in EMR today, and many applications are not configured in a way that promotes usage of their deep capabilities. Hospitals and physicians have made significant investments in EMR; now it’s time to improve and optimize their utilization.”

Eight Mistakes Hospitals Make in EHR

  1. Lacking complete records: Surprisingly, one of the biggest issues with EMR today is the inability to access all available data on a patient.  While a doctor or hospital may use an EMR system, patient data resides in multiple, disparate systems, providing clinicians an incomplete picture. Hospitals are clearly still struggling with interoperability.  Connecting data sources would offer a single view to the provider looking for a consolidated patient record making interoperability a priority for CIOs. While possible today, this is not yet the norm. Fortunately, though, with the proper project planning and data governance discipline, access to consolidated health records is on the horizon.
  1. Missing patient images: A subset of patient data visibility is imaging.  While there are numerous Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) vendors, most do not provide a single source for all images associated with a patient’s record.  EMRs today do a good job of allowing a doctor to look at a patient’s basic information, but not necessarily all of the related images for that patient, beyond radiology.  Images are most prevalent in radiology, but they’re also becoming increasingly important in other medical specialties from cardiology and OBGYN to surgery and wound care. To be most effective, a patient’s electronic medical records need to include all of these images.  Imaging is also important to the finance offices of hospitals and medical practices for storing patients’ insurance cards, driver’s licenses, etc., which need to be accessed on an as-needed basis.
  1. Not following best practices: One of the chief reasons EMR implementations are viewed as unsuccessful is a lack of adequate user training. Users can “get by” based on what they have taught themselves or learned on the floor from peers, but these practices may not be the most effective way of using the features in a system. In a healthcare organization that combines Lean and Six Sigma approaches to deliver performance improvements, many core processes can be improved.  The goals are to save time and reduce costs and overhead.  Using an objective third party to evaluate clinical and financial workflows and processes helps healthcare organizations optimize the use of their technology and, more importantly, the use of their employee resources.
  1. Failing to consider DR: Because health systems are critically reliant on electronic records, system failure is not an option. EMR downtime can cost thousands of dollars per minute. Business disruption, lost revenue, and most importantly, patient safety are at issue during EMR outages. Besides practicing downtime procedures, it’s important to perform periodic data center assessments to identify areas of weakness that can impact end-user experience.  Failing to address gaps leaves the organization vulnerable to downtime.  Another important area to consider is disaster recovery (DR).  Logicalis encourages healthcare clients to examine whether tapping the cloud for disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) might be right for them.  Cloud providers working with healthcare clients should be HIPAA-certified, and clients should ask if a DRaaS solution employs redundancy so that, if part of the system goes down, it automatically fails over to another system to maintain continuous uptime for the healthcare data system.
  1. Missing out on Meaningful Use 2: Under ARRA’s Stage 1 Meaningful Use, healthcare organizations procured and implemented EMR systems. Now, under Meaningful Use Stage 2, they’ll have to prove they’re using them in very specific ways.  Meaningful Use Stage 2, for example, requires providers to offer patient portals to give patients access to their own healthcare data.  It also requires doctors to be able to perform key tasks such as ordering prescriptions electronically through the medical records of a specific patient.  Providers unable to demonstrate meaningful use through activities like these and others by October 1, 2015, will be penalized 1 percent of their Medicare reimbursements, making this a “use it or lose it” scenario. The good news is, actions can be taken now to ensure organizations are prepared for Meaningful Use attestation.
  1. Lacking in mobility: Like business users, many physicians today want to use their own personal devices – iPads or cell phones – to access EMR and text information. If those devices are not secure, however, then they are in violation of HIPAA rules.  With the wide variety of mobile phones and tablets available to clinicians, putting the right security in place to address each device and individual user may mean turning to an experienced third party that can assess the environment and provide specific solutions. Organizations should also ensure they have a regularly updated personal device usage policy that promotes the use of secure, manageable devices.
  1. Missing out on ICD-10 Readiness: Many institutions have taken a wait-and-see approach to implementing ICD-10, a list of medical classification codes.  The requirement to adopt ICD-10 has been delayed until October 1, 2015, but providers that continue to wait will be ill-prepared to address the huge amount of change ICD-10 will bring to the coding environment.  Moving from ICD-9 will increase classifications from 17,000 codes to 141,000 codes. ICD-10 requires more diagnostic specificity, so doctors may now have to use multiple codes for the same condition. This requires a greater attention to detail and a working knowledge of the codes. Fortunately, through careful thought and planning, providers only need to train clinicians on a small subset of the entire code set. Doing so will avoid assumptions and misinformation and will reduce denied insurance claims and reimbursements.  A thorough assessment, planning, communication and training will give providers the tools they need to prepare for this transition.
  1. Lacking in analytics: Hospitals and medical practices capture and store large volumes of data.  The challenge is locating, integrating, gathering and analyzing that data to improve patient safety, contain costs, increase efficiencies, and improve clinical outcomes.  In healthcare, big data isn’t about choosing a platform. It’s about creating a data governance strategy, rationalizing data, and prioritizing analytics initiatives to make the best use of clinical and financial data.

About Logicalis
Logicalis is an international IT solutions and managed services provider with a breadth of knowledge and expertise in communications and collaboration, data center and cloud services, and managed services.

Logicalis employs nearly 3,700 people worldwide, including highly trained service specialists who design, specify, deploy and manage complex ICT infrastructures to meet the needs of almost 6,000 corporate and public sector customers.  To achieve this, Logicalis maintains strong partnerships with technology leaders such as Cisco, HP, IBM, CA Technologies, EMC, NetApp, Microsoft, VMware and ServiceNow.

The Logicalis Group has annualized revenues of $1.6 billion, from operations in Europe, North America, Latin America and Asia Pacific, and is fast establishing itself as one of the leading IT and Communications solution integrators specializing in the areas of advanced technologies and services.

The Logicalis Group is a division of Datatec Limited, listed on the Johannesburg and London AIM Stock Exchanges, with revenues of over $5 billion.

For more information, visit www.us.logicalis.com.

November 11, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

TeraMedica Offers Intelligent Clinical Image Cloud Management thorugh its Evercore® Clinical Enterprise Suite – Powered by Logicalis Cloud

Patented Platform Provides Security, Scalability and Flexibility in the Cloud

(MILWAUKEE, Wisconsin – February 20th, 2012)

TeraMedica today announced that it now features expanded flexibility in intelligent clinical image lifecycle management, further ease of data storage, and a greater reduction of operating costs through its new cloud storage solution. Its Evercore® Clinical Enterprise Suite, the leading Vendor Neutral Archive (VNA) in the industry, now provides more storage options through off-site cloud archiving. TeraMedica is pleased to offer this complete cloud storage solution in partnership with Logicalis.

“Our patented Evercore Clinical Enterprise Suite highlights our commitment to offering choices in improving patient care, reducing cost of healthcare and enhancing physician acceptance in the new patient-centered electronic medical domain,” said Jim Prekop, TeraMedica President and CEO. “Our patented platform was the first to truly offer clinical image lifecycle management, and it’s a natural fit that TeraMedica would also provide the most comprehensive cloud offering in the market.”

“From our work in the industry, we know that medical images often aren’t accessed or needed more than once. So it only makes sense to farm that data off to the cloud,” said Ed Brown, TeraMedica Vice President of Business Development. “Utilizing our intelligent clinical image cloud management services, Evercore Smartstore™ automatically and efficiently moves the data that healthcare providers don’t need to access on an everyday basis, thus significantly saving on storage costs.”

Evercore’s flexible and scalable architecture integrates and manages patient-centric clinical content in the clinical and research settings across wide geographies, including standard DICOM objects. Evercore natively manages and distributes data beyond DICOM using global standards such as MPG, JPG, PDF and many other critical clinical content such as treatment plans for cancer care or vital reports in unstructured data formats.

TeraMedica’s patented Smartstore module intelligently manages the total image lifecycle of DICOM and beyond. Smartstore provides shared enterprise infrastructure for managing clinical content based on business policies, specifically tailored to meet the needs of individual hospitals and/or departments. Evercore’s Univision™ module features a multi-layer, zero-download image viewer, with seamless integration to any EMR/EHR/PHR/RHIO. TeraMedica’s vendor-independent platform connects multiple PACS to any storage system, thus ending cumbersome data migration.

Logicalis, a $1 billion provider of integrated information and communications technology (ICT) solutions and services, offers TeraMedica customers an off-site archiving solution powered by the Logicalis Enterprise Cloud. The Logicalis Enterprise Cloud is an enterprise-class public cloud offering capable of running business critical applications and supporting leading healthcare applications.  It offers TeraMedica customers one of the most flexible cloud archive solutions and adheres to the highest industry standards for data centers.

“Our cloud solution for TeraMedica customers is built from a flexible computing architecture that provides the computing power, memory, storage and bandwidth for an off-site archiving of medical images,” stated Mike Martin, Logicalis Director of Cloud Computing.  In addition, Logicalis provides cloud infrastructure, managed services and HIPAA compliant data handling.

About Logicalis

Logicalis is an international provider of integrated information and communications technology (ICT) solutions and services founded on a superior breadth of knowledge and expertise in communications & collaboration, data center, and cloud computing and managed services. Logicalis Group employs nearly 2,500 people worldwide, including highly trained service specialists who design, specify, deploy and manage complex ICT infrastructures to meet the needs of over 6,000 corporate and public sector customers.  To achieve this, Logicalis maintains strong partnerships with technology leaders such as Cisco, HP, IBM and Microsoft.

The Logicalis Group has annualized revenues of over $1 billion, from operations in the UK, US, Germany, South America and Asia Pacific, and is fast establishing itself as one of the leading IT and Communications solution integrators, specializing in the areas of advanced technologies and services. The Logicalis Group is a division of Datatec Limited, listed on the Johannesburg and London AIM Stock Exchanges, with revenues of approximately $5 billion.

For more information, visit http://www.us.logicalis.com/

About TeraMedica® Inc.

TeraMedica is a healthcare informatics company based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. TeraMedica’s software manages the storage and distribution of digital medical images as well as other clinical content across healthcare and hospital systems, gathering images from imaging devices or PACS, storing them, and distributing them to the point of patient care. TeraMedica’s technology gives physicians virtual access to image data. TeraMedica software uses an advanced enterprise-scale database and “intelligent”, or rules-based, business logic to deliver fast, efficient image management. For more information visit: www.teramedica.com.

February 20, 2012 I Written By